Key Stage 4



Course Overview

Contact Teacher: Mr L Davies

EDUQAS Religious Studies Short Course

All pupils in Year 9 and 10 study RE. In May 2018 our current Year 10 will sit the 3 RE examinations. For more information please check the assessment section.
The course will be followed for one hour a week in Year 9 and 10.

Please see below for the course content.

Course Overview Continue

Pupils will also study two other topics

Option 1: Christianity and Option 3: Islam

Theme 1: Issues of Relationships

This theme requires learners to consider characteristics of relationships, marriage and family life. Through a study of beliefs and teachings, questions relating to issues of relationships in
the twenty-first century will be considered, including same sex relationships and gender
roles. Learners are expected to make relevant references to scripture and other sources of authority.

Areas of Study Specific Content

Relationships

  • Religious beliefs, attitudes and teachings about the nature and purpose of relationships in the twenty first century: families, roles of women and men, marriage outside the religious tradition and cohabitation
  • The nature and purpose of marriage as expressed through the religious marriage ceremonies in Britain and teachings:
  • Varying religious attitudes towards adultery, divorce and annulment and separation and re-marriage.

Sexual relationships

  • religious teachings about the nature and purpose of sex and the
    use of contraception including varied interpretations of the Natural Law/Absolutist approach of Thomas Aquinas' Five Primary Precepts with reference to the second Primary Precept
  • Diverse attitudes within and across religious traditions towards same sex relationships, Issues of equality: and gender prejudice and discrimination
  • Diverse attitudes within religions toward the roles of women and men in worship and authority

Concepts:

From the study of the above areas learners will gain an understanding of the following
concepts:

  • adultery
  • divorce
  • cohabitation
  • commitment
  • contraception
  • gender equality
  • responsibilities
  • roles

Learners should be able to explain and apply these concepts in relation to the theme. Pupils will mainly use the religions of Christianity and Islam to study these issues but pupils are able to answer from a Christian and a different religion other than Christianity.

Theme 2: Issues of Life and Death

This theme requires learners to consider religious and non-religious beliefs about the nature
of life and death and the origins and value of the universe and human life.
Learners are expected to make relevant references to scripture and other sources of authority as well as the beliefs of Humanists and Atheists.

Areas of Study Specific Content

The world

  • Diverse religious beliefs, teachings and attitudes about the accounts of the origin of the universe: Genesis 1 and 2 as examples
  • The relationship between religious views and non-religious views of creation and the extent to which they conflict; Stephen Hawking's view of the Big Bang
  • Religious and non-religious beliefs, teachings and attitudes about dominion, stewardship, environmental responsibility, sustainability, and global citizenship:  'Humanists for a Better World' The origin and value of human life
  • Diverse religious beliefs, teachings and attitudes toward the origin and sanctity of human life:
    • Non-religious beliefs about evolution; Charles Darwin, Richard Dawkins
    • Diverse religious attitudes towards abortion and euthanasia
    • Non-religious views on the importance of human and animal life; Peter Singer's views on 'speciesism'
    • Humanist 'Dignity in Dying' Movement Beliefs about death and the afterlife
    • Religious beliefs and teachings about life after death, including soul, judgement, heaven and hell:
    • Diverse religious beliefs about the after-life
    • How Religious and Humanist funerals in Britain reflect beliefs about the afterlife

Concepts:

From the study of the areas above, learners will gain an understanding of the following
concepts:

  • afterlife
  • environmental sustainability
  • euthanasia
  • evolution
  • abortion
  • quality of life
  • sanctity of life
  • soul

Learners should be able to explain and apply these concepts in relation to the theme. Pupils will mainly use the religions of Christianity and Islam to study these issues but pupils are able to answer from a Christian and a different religion other than Christianity.

Option 1 Study of Christianity


Written examination: 30 minutes
25% of qualification
30 marks (plus 3 for spelling, punctuation and grammar)

Christianity

The compulsory nature of this component ensures that learners know and understand the fact that the religious traditions of Great Britain are, in the main, Christian, but also diverse and include the following religious and non-religious traditions: Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Sikhism, Humanism and Atheism. This knowledge may be applied throughout the assessment of the specified content.
Learners must know, understand and express common and divergent views and the basis for beliefs, teachings and practices. References to relevant sources of wisdom and authority are expected, including scripture and/or sacred texts.

Beliefs and teachings
Areas of Study Specific Content

Beliefs in Great Britain

  • Christianity in Britain; results of the 2011 census compared to the 2001 census, showing an increase in diverse religious and non-religious beliefs and practices (including Christianity,Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Sikhism, Humanism and Atheism), whilst also showing that more than half of those who responded considered themselves Christian
  • U.K. laws, festivals and traditions rooted in the Christian tradition

The nature of God 

  • Omnipotent: Exodus 7-11, Exodus 14:21: Omni-benevolent: Psalm 86:15, John 3:16, Romans 8: 37-39. Evil and suffering: Quote on God and evil from Epicurus, Book of Job 1: 8 -12, 42:1-6
  • The Trinity, beliefs and teachings about the oneness of God: Father, Son and Holy Spirit: John 10:30, John 14: 6-11 Creation Genesis 1-3; nature and role of humans, literal and non-literal ways of interpretation.
  • The role of Word and Spirit in creation: John 1:1-5 Jesus Christ Beliefs and teachings about Jesus’ incarnation: John 1:14, Luke1:28-33
  • Crucifixion: Matthew 27:28-50; Salvation and Atonement: Matthew 26:26-29, Leviticus 16:20-22, Isaiah 53:3-9.
  • Resurrection: Luke 24:1-9,1 Corinthians 15:3-8, 12-14
  • Ascension: Luke 24:50-53 Salvation Law: Word of God; inspiration and revelation; differing ways of interpreting biblical writings; Bible in relation to other sources of authority.
  • Sin as preventing salvation.
  • Grace and the Spirit Acts 2:1-6. The role of Holy Spirit in Evangelical worship. The afterlife 
  • Eschatological beliefs: John 11:25-26, John 14:2-7
  • Judgement: Matthew 25:31-46, Luke 16:19-31
  • Resurrection: 1 Corinthians 15:42-55
  • Traditional and contemporary beliefs about Heaven and Hell

From the study of the areas above learners will gain an understanding of the following
concepts:

  • Omnipotent
  • Omnibenevolent
  • Trinity
  • Incarnation
  • Atonement
  • Resurrection
  • Salvation
  • Judgement

Learners should be able to explain and apply these concepts in relation to the theme.

Option 2 Study of a World Faith

Written examination: 30 minutes
25% of qualification
30 marks

Option 3: Islam

Learners should be aware that Islam is one of a diverse range of religious traditions and beliefs in Great Britain today that also includes Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Sikhism, Humanism and Atheism but that the main religious tradition in Great Britain is Christian. This knowledge may be applied throughout the assessment of the specified content.

Learners must know, understand and express common and divergent views and the basis for beliefs, teachings and practices. References to relevant sources of wisdom and authority are expected, including scripture and/or sacred texts.

Beliefs and teachings
Areas of Study Specific Content

The Nature of Allah

  • The teaching about the nature of Allah: the belief in the oneness of Allah (Tawhid): Qur'an 3:18
  • Nature of Allah: immanence, transcendence, omnipotence, beneficence, mercy, fairness and justice: Qur'an 46:33
  • Adalat in Shi'a Islam Prophethood (Risalah)
  • The nature of prophethood; why are prophets important? Qur'an 2:136
  • The importance of Adam as the first prophet
  • Ibrahim as father of Isaac and Ishma'il and his significance for the Muslim religion
  • Isa as a prophet for Muslims: Qur'an 2:87
  • Muhammad as the seal of the Prophets Angels (Malaikah) The significance of angels in Islam: Qur’an 2:97-98, Qur’an 2:285
  • Diversity in belief between Shi'a and Sunni Muslims regarding angels and free will
  • The significance of Jibril's revelation of the Qur'an to Muhammad: Qur’an 2:97-98
  • The significance of Mika'il placed in charge of plants and rain
  • The significance of Israfil to announce the Day of Resurrection Akhirah (Afterlife)
  • Al-Qadr (Predestination): Implications for human freedom
  • Akhirah: Human responsibility and accountability; Muslim beliefs and teachings about the afterlife
  • Human Freedom and its relationship to Day of Judgement
  • Heaven; Muslim beliefs about the nature, stages and purpose of heaven
  • Hell; Muslim beliefs about the nature and purpose of Hell  Foundations of faith
  • The six articles of faith in Sunni Islam
  • The five roots in Usul ad-Din in Shi'a Islam
  • Islamic attitudes towards Kutub (books), Sahifah (Scrolls), Injil (Gospel), Tawrat (Torah), Zabur (Psalms)

 From the study of the areas above learners will gain an understanding of the following concepts:

  • Tawhid
  • Prophethood
  • Allah
  • Immanence
  • Transcendence
  • Angels
  • Al Qadr
  • Akirah

Learners should be able to explain and apply these concepts in relation to the religion.

Assesment

At the end of the course there will be 3 written examinations, the first hour examination will test the topics Relationships and Matters of life and death. This examination is followed by two 30 minute examinations, one on Christianity and one on Islam. There is no coursework. Pupils will be entered for the final examinations based on their overall performance on class work, homework and their results in examinations and assessments taken during Year 9 and 10. Those entered for the examination will be given the opportunity to gain a short qualification in RS worth the equivalent of half a GCSE.

Youtube Revison Links

Below are a list of Youtube links to help you with revision

 

Revision Guide

 

          Click here to view the Revision Guide

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